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How to Sleep Better at Night

Sleep plays a vital role in your physical health, emotional well-being and overall quality of life. Yet medical reports show that one in three adults experience insomnia. Ongoing sleep deprivation impacts the way that our brains function and can even make us more at risk for certain chronic diseases. However, medical research has shown that there are numerous strategies that can greatly improve our sleep quality!

Exercise:
Daily exercise can help us sleep better. Researchers determined that adults who exercise for 30 minutes at least three to four times per week sleep on average, nearly 45 minutes to an hour longer than adults who do not exercise regularly. In addition to an improvement in sleep quality, people also feel more alert during the day. Although, it’s important not to exercise right before bed because this could actually keep you awake rather than helping you sleep!

Get on a schedule:
Going to bed and getting up at the same time every day can reinforce your body’s sleep-wake cycle and improve sleep quality. Erratic sleep schedules can leave you feeling groggy during the day since it impacts your body’s biological clock. Therefore, it’s important to maintain a consistent sleep pattern on workdays, weekends and holidays – no matter how badly you might want to sleep in!

Limit caffeine and alcohol intake:
Caffeine, a common stimulant in coffee, chocolate, sodas and tea, causes hyperactivity and sleeplessness. Try to avoid consuming caffeine after lunchtime. Additionally, health experts also claim that tyrosine-rich foods like fermented cheeses, avocados, some types of beer and red wine can worsen sleep quality. While some studies show that moderate alcohol might help you fall asleep, it actually contributes to sleep disturbances and frequent early awakening.

Manage stress:
Stress often contributes to insomnia by making it difficult fall asleep and stay asleep. The right amount of stress can help keep us alert and energetic during the day. Too much stress can make us anxious and tense, making it difficult to stop our racing minds when trying to fall asleep. It sends our brains into overdrive and can create a vicious cycle of insomnia. If you have a stressful job or find it difficult to turn off your mind at night, it may be beneficial to incorporate a stress management program into your daily routine.

Unplug:
Recent studies show just how much the white light from our smartphones, laptops, and televisions impact our sleep. Try to unplug and read a book instead an hour before you wish to fall asleep. This might take away some of your stress too!

Sleep is vital to our health – physical and mental! Get the rest your body needs by following our tips!

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